A Travellerspoint blog

April 25 - May 1: Many, Many Birds!

all seasons in one day 64 °F

Migration has now hit northern Illinois in full swing! I have seen a huge number of birds recently, just haven't had the time to post about them due to the AP psychology exam and other school and musical obligations!

Since this post, covers up quite a few days, I will split it up day-by-day. Get ready for many, many photos!

MONDAY, APRIL 25:

Some birding on the way to and from school yielded some nice migrants, including my first WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW of the year:
B1224C59EF5A3C060141B0736E4261C3.jpeg

And its cousin, the WHITE-THROATED SPARROW:
B1238B50A2BBF5BDE13C8B31EF4ACE93.jpeg

A male NASHVILLE WARBLER was nice:
B124E9FEC2649E5662C11560171EB785.jpeg

As was this PALM WARBLER:
B125FDCD9F0915DA207977903B258D49.jpeg

HERMIT THRUSHES abounded:
B126FAEE0DB373C53153251A48DE7586.jpeg
B1296812FA72E8A9CF569584062F522B.jpeg

And my best find of the day we this beautiful BLUE-HEADED VIREO, which will be the bird-of-the-day for Monday, April 25.
B1282233993D06AF2D29D8BD8FE45512.jpeg

TUESDAY, APRIL 26:

More birds to and from school brightened my day, including this YELLOW-THROATED VIREO:
B12ABCB89624DAF7761B6BE41669F1FD.jpeg

And a rather early TENNESSEE WARBLER:
B12FFC45C863E57CC2B262A2E3FB7ACF.jpegB130F6E2C48FA2657C388A141B77CAF4.jpeg

An uncommon BLUE-WINGED WARBLER was my best find of the day, even though it only allowed for this one crappy photo:
B132120AB1E1EF7E2A1D7F1B1F07085B.jpeg

This male YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER allowed for a beautiful photo:
B1335681AB544BCB9928F37C5942E960.jpeg

And I found my FOY (first-of-the-year) BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER:
B134B45FF3333E1C62EB1D26CAB64330.jpeg

And this male NASHVILLE WARBLER showed off his beautiful yellow breast:
B13621F4FEDE5D1180C7CC24C55E22D2.jpeg

This HAIRY WOODPECKER was a nice, uncommon find for Oak Park.
B1373C99CF83C1A6DB15FCACC25E0111.jpeg

Bird-of-the-day for Tuesday goes to the Blue-winged Warbler, the most uncommon species of the day, even though it only allowed for mediocre photos.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27:

Due to a late-arrival Wednesday school schedule, I led a 7:00am Oak Park Bird Walk which turned out to be quite productive. It started off well with a late-in-the-season PINE SISKIN, a bird much more common in Illinois from November - March.
B1386FFBA7C521B49769047FE65AA46C.jpeg

HERMIT THRUSH:
B13D1EA5080861190EE90F90A6582221.jpeg

BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER:
B13F671A9EAED9F3D648C69273B43D17.jpeg

A few WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS foraged on the ground ahead of the group:
B141E0410D05A42C303388B100BF58D5.jpeg

My (FOY) BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER was a treat to see, always a beautiful and charismatic species:
B142F8D7B4332A4F4377C39F3EC96695.jpegB14445E2C6714A4EE1483371E24FC30F.jpeg

After the walk, I birded a bit more and found a few more species, including this molting male INDIGO BUNTING, my first-of-the-year:
B145A1D7DF4968FD51AEED5BD17E9C60.jpeg

And my (FOY) PURPLE FINCH, a female, sharing the thistle feeder with the resident AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES:
B1511BFBD362F9C4317EED815A53D420.jpeg
B15233B39C286DB5698E829E08030F99.jpeg

Male WHITE-THROATED SPARROW:
B14A3C36CBB8A59CF4ADD55EFC517A5E.jpeg

Bird-of-the-day for Wednesday goes to the beautiful Black-and-White Warbler.

THURSDAY, APRIL 28:

This BROAD-WINGED HAWK was a nice, uncommon find for Oak Park:
B14B7EFDCE57FA30F6A03D3AE8D2AA23.jpegB14CA30FDA12D13A6AFFDCBA8E01B97F.jpeg

After I got home from school on Thursday, I received an email saying that an extremely rare Townsend's Warbler had shown up in Millenium Park in downtown Chicago. Considering that this is a bird usually found in California and Oregon this time of year, I immediately hopped on my bike and rode the train downtown.

Upon arriving at Millenium Park, I had trouble finding the warbler amongst many other birds in the area, including this male WHITE-THROATED SPARROW:
B14EDD3CBA795C96445ADA0A4A29300B.jpeg

I called the person who had found the warbler, Matthew Cvetas, and he gave me detailed directions about where to look for the bird, and funnily enough, I was soon scanning a row of flowering trees just spitting distance from "The Bean." Who knew such rare birds turn up in such seemingly obvious locations! The warbler; however, so far wasn't being so "obvious" for me!

A warbler - but a NASHVILLE, not a Townsend's:
B14FFCFAFFB827FE6324FB7B733EDCD1.jpeg

FINALLY, I found a warbler with a yellow cheek and heavy black facial markings - and voila! - I had my TOWNSEND'S WARBLER, not a life bird, but the first time I have seen this bird outside of Arizona:
B159511D908D826FD1AAC46D99642831.jpegB15A79F8AFC6D273D915D174324DBE29.jpeg

A bit of birding on the walk out of the park yielded a nice NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH:
B15BF1370D8D5C26EAEB3FC3BB03726D.jpeg

And this WHITE-THROATED SPARROW and HERMIT THRUSH hung out cooperatively for a photo together:
B15CB4C9F101D633DCD2865D020B9FD6.jpeg

Bird-of-the-day for Thursday obviously goes to the Townsend's Warbler.

FRIDAY, APRIL 28:

More local birding around the neighborhood on Friday. I photographed this pretty male AMERICAN GOLDFINCH on the thistle feeder:
B15DD97BEC3203895D51010C17369FB5.jpeg

WHITE-THROATED SPARROW:
B15EBDF5E48639A8E5038D033EB6A15C.jpeg

Molting male INDIGO BUNTING, my bird-of-the-day for Friday, singing away:
B16020ACC6A454C0B8DA5B480A3CE490.jpeg

SATURDAY, APRIL 29:

On Saturday, I led a bird walk in the morning before the rains moved in, and this mystery bird at the beginning of the walk was later identified as a drab first-year female PINE WARBLER:
B1615B3EA0DBCD746C18F09ABFB41C22.jpeg

This GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER was annoying since it is a very uncommon bird and due to the poor looks we attained (as evidenced by the quality of this photo), I only was able to identify the bird after the walk from looking at this photo:
B1696B51CFEFC7A33B9F30159BC158C6.jpeg

A BROAD-WINGED HAWK was nice again:
B16A7535B01B336FDA4A675EB523260E.jpeg

My first-of-the-year OVENBIRD was a welcome sighting:
B16BA276ED92AC6BB11C56C94F7345DB.jpeg

A BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER allowed for nice photo opportunities:
B16CD887ABCBB79A6CFC1F9D4BF36512.jpeg

PALM WARBLER:
B16E7832FD3158A2174C79D46B545B5D.jpeg

Bird-of-the-day to the cooperative Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, a subtly beautiful bird.

SUNDAY, MAY 1:

May started off amazingly well with a super productive bird walk that I led at Thatcher Woods Forest Preserve in conjunction with the Illinois Young Birders' Club. We found 63 species in total, including an astonishing 14 different types of warblers - quite impressive for so early in May!

A latish YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER:
B165EDFB0355B978B55FB9583E5D1E05.jpeg

SWAINSON'S THRUSH:
B16706C3FB573E5930F3C4175E420D34.jpeg

ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER:
B174E9C8D5856606A8B61517EB6DC1A0.jpeg

BROWN THRASHER:
B17648B2EF293595A34D0FD2D2DB1243.jpeg

Male WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW:
B1777DC3DA9976FB5251105F664CE2EC.jpeg

This SOLITARY SANDPIPER was a surprising find in the middle of the soccer field at Thatcher:
B17872AA03D1D32D80D63C7F7BB80827.jpeg

BLUE-HEADED VIREO. We located the most productive stretch of the forest, which was the wooded swampland west of the soccer field. Warblers, sparrows, vireos, you name it, were everywhere! It was the most productive I have ever seen Thatcher Woods!
B179C184BF79DDA926B4C8E2D1E1DEB3.jpeg

Male COMMON YELLOWTHROAT:
B17ACAF2B161A15679D955DB3EA39990.jpeg

Male BLACK-AND WHITE WARBLER:
B17BDEB3BBC2FAF8189DFE30258A9F87.jpeg

Female:
B180DB8EFEA859BA268882F96C73690E.jpeg

VEERY:
B17CD3DFB2BCF43F16D698B6ABC8EB1C.jpeg

It was a fantastic walk! After leading the group around, I stopped at the Trailside Museum where they were in the process of banding feeder birds with the use of mist nets. Very cool! When I visited, they had caught this female DOWNY WOODPECKER:
B1831DBBA0E52D010F7080A716C4B2D7.jpeg

A bit more birding by myself afterwards yielded more goodies, including this male BALTIMORE ORIOLE, a true harbinger of spring and summer:
B1841D39F7313393F0ED350CF9E4C713.jpeg

Male ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK:
B1854C09B51B20F02A3D333FCA227BC0.jpeg

Female YELLOW WARBLER:
B1869C0E021E4F2B78FE6086258BDB2D.jpeg

My best find of the day at Thatcher Woods was right at the end, when I spotted this magnificent RED-HEADED WOODPECKER, a vulnerable and declining species that is very uncommon in northeast Illinois and that I have never seen in the Oak Park/River Forest area before! So cool!
B18797F19896FCB41D785EA43CB5670A.jpeg

Bird-of-the-day to Sunday, May 1 obviously goes to the Red-headed Woodpecker.

Whew! More photos of migration madness to come this weekend! Nothing beats birding in May!

Happy spring migration,

Henry
World Life List: 884 Species (no recent life birds)

Posted by skwclar 19:48 Archived in USA Tagged me people trees animals birds sky

Email this entryFacebookStumbleUpon

Table of contents

Comments

Thanks for sharing all your great pictures!

by Mary Stevens

Comments on this blog entry are now closed to non-Travellerspoint members. You can still leave a comment if you are a member of Travellerspoint.

Enter your Travellerspoint login details below

( What's this? )

If you aren't a member of Travellerspoint yet, you can join for free.

Join Travellerspoint