A Travellerspoint blog

Birding around Chicago

Chicago, IL

overcast 49 °F

Today, Kim Habel generously offered to take me to Montrose Point Bird Sanctuary for the morning!

The Magic Hedge was rather slow with only a few birds such as these BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHERS:
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LEAST FLYCATCHER was nice:
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As was LINCOLN’S SPARROW:
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There wasn’t much on the beach except for many CASPIAN TERNS such as these individuals, here pictured with a RING-BILLED GULL:
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Male YELLOW WARBLER:
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SWAMP SPARROW:
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This WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW gave us the cold shoulder:
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Kim and I had fun feeding a few of the very tame BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES at Montrose.
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Female EASTERN TOWHEE:
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Then I ran into my friends Isoo, Eddie, Brett, & Ben who told me the Kirtland’s Warbler from yesterday was still around. Considering that Montrose was slow and windy and the warbler would be a life bird for Kim, we drove down to Grant Park and, like yesterday, promptly found the cooperative bird! KIRTLAND’S WARBLER — awesome!
large_DD9D2FEE-5CAB-4557-AC26-436F86EDA0D9.jpeglarge_B63984DF-8264-4467-97D5-B05409BD1C7E.jpeglarge_57A5CD29-9447-4714-8FA6-D079F7D15F6D.jpeglarge_2D0390D4-C166-41CB-A89D-424BE6162922.jpeglarge_938F1414-ACBD-487D-A4B8-B8DBCF76ACD8.jpeglarge_624531F7-83BD-4419-A268-2C453B456230.jpeg

Thanks so much to Kim for driving and birding with me! Later this afternoon, I birded a little around the house in Oak Park and found some nice things, such as a very cooperative NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH:
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VEERY:
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ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS put on a pretty show for my family and I in the back yard today:
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Bird-of-the-day once again, by far, to the Kirtland’s Warbler which salvaged an otherwise slow day despite our best efforts.

Good birding,
Henry
World Life List: 971 Species

Posted by skwclar 15:19 Archived in USA Comments (2)

Back to Oak Park!

Chicago, IL

rain 47 °F

Today was my first day back in Chicago! I woke up bright and early to lead an Oak Park Bird Walk since it is prime season to find migratory birds in this area. Fifteen birders showed up and we saw some great things!

Before the walk, I spotted this YELLOW WARBLER:
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Male CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER:
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A nice BLUE-WINGED WARBLER started off the walk well:
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WARBLING VIREO:
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PINE SISKIN was unexpected and nice:
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BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER:
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TENNESSEE WARBLER:
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Male AMERICAN KESTREL near the high school where they nest:
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Later another flew over:
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A late sighting was this RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH:
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Female BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD:
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This male AMERICAN REDSTART put on a show for us, fanning his tail and showing off his brilliant colors:
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VEERY:
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HOUSE WREN:
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This male ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK posed very nicely for us:
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WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW:
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Another with a male AMERICAN GOLDFINCH:
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AMERICAN ROBIN on her nest:
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Everyone loved seeing this brilliant SCARLET TANAGER male at eye level:
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And a male NASHVILLE WARBLER, one of many today, to end the walk:
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What a successful first walk of the year — 38 species, 15 birders, and $115 raised for La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica! Good stuff, thanks to all for their generosity!

Later, I headed over to Grant Park downtown where a Kirtland’s Warbler had been seen this morning! This endangered species breeds only in Michigan and Wisconsin and it is incredibly lucky to find one of these elusive birds in migration. I have only seen this species once before, on its wintering grounds in the Bahamas, so I was really hoping to find it!

And find it I did. As I arrived, a photographer was searching the appropriate row of trees I had read about in the description of the bird and he said he had just had the bird. I started spishing, and sure enough, the lovely, tail-wagging male KIRTLAND’S WARBLER popped out for a brief look:
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Ten minutes later, he gave even better looks once multiple people had arrived:
large_3FE75693-18E5-4889-86A0-8CAC938B0018.jpeglarge_90CAB04A-8A17-4895-B3D8-9C7501E953F7.jpeglarge_6D0C03CA-B9F8-4136-84AC-3B46E43A52A0.jpeglarge_7E425F79-5B2C-41E7-9113-4B664CA6685A.jpeglarge_64E64DAF-DC40-4409-966B-0D999FE732FA.jpeglarge_A1CCD491-BF32-4EAB-8C6E-0727ADA886F1.jpeglarge_AB79C9CB-938B-4C16-A1C1-2629FF732ACE.jpeglarge_4A63E808-9E44-44FF-9E90-8A63E2A1DC63.jpeglarge_42211007-8D84-4B04-A213-9EE85E14A9F7.jpeglarge_4BE82D88-1558-4384-AF35-39ED678C5BEB.jpeglarge_EBE09784-7F2B-47A2-8C5B-3206915643E2.jpeglarge_4BD2C8E8-8069-4BDB-91BC-0EB8F86CFE31.jpeg

Then, the cold and rain drove me off, but nevertheless, mission accomplished! WHAT A BIRD! Too cool — the only difference is that if this was New York City, there wouldn’t be five people watching the bird, but fifty-five! Somewhat refreshing to get back to Chicago...

Bird-of-the-day to the Kirtland’s Warbler, by far! Stay tuned — tomorrow birder Kim Habel and I will be covering Montrose Point Bird Sanctuary in the morning!

Good birding,
Henry
World Life List: 971 Species

Posted by skwclar 12:43 Archived in USA Comments (3)

An afternoon in the park

Central Park, NYC

sunny 62 °F

After finishing my final exams, I headed to Central Park upon hearing a report of a vagrant Evening Grosbeak that had turned up at the Evodia Feeders in the Ramble!

One of my first birds in the park was this very cooperative male BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER:
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And the female:
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Then, after a few minutes of scanning the trees around the feeders, a birder shouted that he’d spotted the EVENING GROSBEAK and sure enough there was the bird! Too cool — this is a rarity for New York City in the winter, and absolutely unheard in other months! I guess this bird may be on its way northward after their invasion along the East Coast this past winter.
large_21818165-3C46-41AD-B1A7-B6520A9EBB95.jpeglarge_A196B068-A691-4B46-B132-934FCFC4F1C2.jpeglarge_38EC0455-BEED-416F-9A2C-24C70C703A2C.jpeglarge_B84A246D-E0D4-4629-B5BB-8EEC4EC0A381.jpeglarge_02325255-3B9D-48DC-A017-45262E1757D7.jpeglarge_5D6B77BF-93CD-4D53-B9B8-9A93714337F2.jpeglarge_88304464-CF35-4BB0-871A-99ED10F2EB9C.jpeglarge_E61E43D2-DB53-4F85-AB85-718A56132571.jpeg

Then the other grosbeak for the day, ROSE-BREASTED, came in to join the fun:
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I was even able to snap a few photos of the two grosbeak species together, something I never would have dreamed of doing since the Evening is such a winter bird and the Rose-breasted such a summer species!
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Female BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER:
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Male NORTHERN PARULA:
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VEERY:
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SWAINSON’S THRUSH were more evident than ever, by far more common than Hermit Thrush by now:
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An extremely cool sighting was seeing this rare roosting Red Bat which a kind woman pointed out to me:
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GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER:
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GRAY CATBIRD:
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Male COMMON YELLOWTHROAT:
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Male MAGNOLIA WARBLER:
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WOOD THRUSH, which sang its beautiful song a few times:
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This was the only HERMIT THRUSH today, a stark contrast from the many present just a few days ago:
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YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, getting quite late for these:
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NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH:
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Then, I headed over to a place called “Strawberry Fields” in the park where a Summer Tanager had reportedly been seen.

BLACKPOLL WARBLER was a nice first sighting of spring:
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Although I failed to find the Summer Tanager, an abundance of cooperative SCARLET TANAGERS absolutely made up for it, including this female:
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And of course, the stunning male:
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Bird-of-the-day to the Evening Grosbeak with runners-up to the Black-throated Blue Warbler, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, and Scarlet Tanager. Stay tuned — I am in for one more day of Central Park birding tomorrow morning before I head home for the summer friday! Then, I will lead Oak Park Bird Walks and spend a weekend in Indiana with my friend Kim Habel as we tackle the Indiana Dunes Birding Festival which should be a jolly good time!

Good birding,
Henry
World Life List: 971 Species

Posted by skwclar 15:29 Archived in USA Comments (1)

Jamaica Bay in Springtime

New York, NY

sunny 59 °F

Yesterday, I was planning on visiting Central Park since I had most of the day free. When I woke up, though, reports were saying that the park was much less active than anticipated. Accordingly, I changed plans because I had wanted to visit Jamaica Bay before I fly home Friday, so I took the opportunity of this free day to do so. After a commute on the M100 bus, the A train, and the Q53 bus, I made it around 9:30am.

I started off my birding day by making the long loop around the West Pond near the Visitor Center. I found these LEAST SANDPIPERS:
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A single BOAT-TAILED GRACKLE foraged out in the saltmarsh — I would end up seeing a few of these throughout the day:
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An OSPREY, one of multiple nesting pairs in Jamaica Bay, flew over. At one point, I saw one come in with a gigantic fish in its talons; the fish was nearly as long as the bird!
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There were a few terns flying about, particularly early in the morning. The highlight of my morning was by far seeing this LEAST TERN with a strikingly yellow bill fly by. Unfortunately, it flew with such an erratic flight and it was so tiny that I only managed this one horrible photo. Within it, though, you can definitely see its lemon-yellow bill!
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BLUE-WINGED TEAL flyovers:
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Another highlight was when I approached the edge of the saltmarsh and I saw a long-tailed sparrow duck into the marsh grass. It soon teed up a little, allowing for these horrible but, once again, clinching photos: SEASIDE SPARROW! This was a life bird for me just last week!
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GLOSSY IBIS flew over a few times:
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TREE SWALLOW perched on its nest box:
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GREAT EGRET:
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RUDDY DUCKS:
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FORSTER’S TERN, I saw many of these this morning:
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As I did LAUGHING GULLS — nice to finally see in breeding plumage:
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Mimidae, also known as the mockingbird family, rule at Jamaica Bay. Here is a BROWN THRASHER:
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And its relative the GRAY CATBIRD:
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And of course the ubiquitous NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD. All three of these species sing vociferously and mimic many other avian species, hence their Latin family name. They can all be found by walking the West Pond loop trail.
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Male EASTERN TOWHEE singing:
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Male YELLOW WARBLER:
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AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER:
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This LINCOLN’S SPARROW, my first of the year, was a nice surprise:
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As was this late RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH:
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A great mixed flock of warblers appeared by the end of the West Pond trail, including a male BLACK-AND-WHITE:
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And multiple cooperative YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS:
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As well as a NORTHERN PARULA:
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Then, I headed over to check out East Pond where I heard there was a Barn Owl nesting box that has been occupied by these beautiful birds. Thanks to a kindly birder, I was able to spot a NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW over the pond:
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A male PRAIRIE WARBLER was really nice to see:
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And here is the Barn Owl nesting box — unfortunately mama owl didn’t ever peek her head out for me, but I am sure she was snoozing the day away inside.
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BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON at Big John’s Pond:
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Male COMMON YELLOWTHROAT:
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Male RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD:
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Then, I walked over to the viewing platform past the Visitor Center where I was hoping to possibly see the Least Tern again for better photos. There was a SNOWY EGRET:
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BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS:
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A species I have never seen in New York before, a YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON, was a great treat:
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GREATER YELLOWLEGS:
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There was a flock of far-away roosting shorebirds which included WILLETS and RUDDY TURNSTONES:
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As well as DUNLIN:
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The Least Tern never reappeared for a better photo, but that won’t stop me from making that life bird my bird-of-the-day! Runner-up to the Seaside Sparrow.

Good birding,
Henry
World Life List: 971 Species (1 life bird today: Least Tern)

Posted by skwclar 11:20 Archived in USA Comments (0)

The calm before the storm...

Central Park, NYC

overcast 68 °F

After seeing a report of a Blue Grosbeak at the Evodia Feeders in the Central Park Ramble, I knew I had to bird Central Park this afternoon upon finishing my humanities final exam.

Upon arriving, seeing this male BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER was nice:
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As was the male ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK:
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Male HOUSE FINCH:
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Male BLUE-WINGED WARBLER:
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NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH:
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Male COMMON YELLOWTHROAT:
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OVENBIRD:
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SWAINSON’S THRUSH:
large_E85A1AA8-3623-41D6-AC07-5A4754897A81.jpeg

BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER:
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Although it was a quieter day and I failed to see the Blue Grosbeak because I soon got rained out, it was still nice to get out and enjoy the park after school. Bird-of-the-day to the Black-throated Blue Warbler.

Stay tuned — the title of this post comes from the fact that tomorrow is predicted to be possibly the best day of migration yet this year! There is MASSIVE movement of birds shown on the radar across the East Coast tonight. And the great news is that I don’t have class until 4pm!

Good birding,
Henry
World Life List: 970 Species

Posted by skwclar 20:18 Archived in USA Comments (0)

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